Chelsea Won, and You Bought a T-shirt: Characterizing the Interplay Between Twitter and E-Commerce

In proceedings of The 2013 IEEE/ACM International Conference on Advances in Social Networks Analysis and Mining, ASONAM 2013. 829-836. (Best Paper Award Winner)
Chelsea Won, and You Bought a T-shirt: Characterizing the Interplay Between Twitter and E-Commerce
Haipeng Zhang, Nish Parikh, Neel Sundaresan
eBay Authors
Abstract

The popularity of social media sites like Twitter and Facebook opens up interesting research opportunities for understanding the interplay of social media and e-commerce. Most research on online behavior, up until recently, has focused mostly on social media behaviors and e-commerce behaviors independently.

In our study we choose a particular global ecommerce platform (eBay) and a particular global social media platform (Twitter). We quantify the characteristics of the two individual trends as well as the correlations between them.

We provide evidences that about 5% of general eBay query streams show strong positive correlations with the corresponding Twitter mention streams, while the percentage jumps to around 25% for trending eBay query streams. Some categories of eBay queries, such as 'Video Games' and 'Sports', are more likely to have strong correlations.

We also discover that eBay trend lags Twitter for correlated pairs and the lag differs across categories. We show evidences that celebrities' popularities on Twitter correlate well with their relevant search and sales on eBay.

The correlations and lags provide predictive insights for future applications that might lead to instant merchandising opportunities for both sellers and e-commerce platforms.

Another publication from the same author:

In proceedings of the Workshop on Log-based Personalization (the 4th WSCD workshop) at WSDM 2014

A Large Scale Query Logs Analysis for Assessing Personalization Opportunities in E-commerce Sites

Neel Sundaresan, Zitao Liu

Personalization offers the promise of improving online search and shopping experience. In this work, we perform a large scale analysis on the sample of eBay query logs, which involves 9.24 billion session data spanning 12 months (08/2012-07/2013) and address the following topics

(1) What user information is useful for personalization;

(2) Importance of per-query personalization

(3) Importance of recency in query prediction.

In this paper, we study these problems and provide some preliminary conclusions

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Another publication from the same category: Machine Learning and Data Science

WWW '17 Perth Australia April 2017

Drawing Sound Conclusions from Noisy Judgments

David Goldberg, Andrew Trotman, Xiao Wang, Wei Min, Zongru Wan

The quality of a search engine is typically evaluated using hand-labeled data sets, where the labels indicate the relevance of documents to queries. Often the number of labels needed is too large to be created by the best annotators, and so less accurate labels (e.g. from crowdsourcing) must be used. This introduces errors in the labels, and thus errors in standard precision metrics (such as P@k and DCG); the lower the quality of the judge, the more errorful the labels, consequently the more inaccurate the metric. We introduce equations and algorithms that can adjust the metrics to the values they would have had if there were no annotation errors.

This is especially important when two search engines are compared by comparing their metrics. We give examples where one engine appeared to be statistically significantly better than the other, but the effect disappeared after the metrics were corrected for annotation error. In other words the evidence supporting a statistical difference was illusory, and caused by a failure to account for annotation error.

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