Anatomy of a Web-Scale Resale Market: A Data Mining Approach

in Proceedings of the 22nd international conference on World Wide Web (WWW ’13)
Anatomy of a Web-Scale Resale Market: A Data Mining Approach
Yuchen Zhao, Neel Sundaresan, Zeqian Shen, Philip Yu
Abstract

Reuse and remarketing of content and products is an integral part of the internet. As E-commerce has grown, online resale and secondary markets form a significant part of the commerce space. The intentions and methods for reselling are diverse. In this paper, we study an instance of such markets that affords interesting data at large scale for mining purposes to understand the properties and patterns of this online market.

As part of knowledge discovery of such a market, we first formally propose criteria to reveal unseen resale behaviors by elastic matching identification (EMI) based on the account transfer and item similarity properties of transactions.

Then, we present a large-scale system that leverages MapReduce paradigm to mine millions of online resale activities from petabyte scale heterogeneous ecommerce data. With the collected data, we show that the number of resale activities leads to a power law distribution with a ‘long tail’, where a significant share of users only resell in very low numbers and a large portion of resales come from a small number of highly active resellers.

We further conduct a comprehensive empirical study from different aspects of resales, including the temporal, spatial patterns, user demographics, reputation and the content of sale postings. Based on these observations, we explore the features related to “successful” resale transactions and evaluate if they can be predictable.

We also discuss uses of this information mining for business insights and user experience on a real-world online marketplace.

Another publication from the same category: Machine Learning and Data Science

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Drawing Sound Conclusions from Noisy Judgments

David Goldberg, Andrew Trotman, Xiao Wang, Wei Min, Zongru Wan

The quality of a search engine is typically evaluated using hand-labeled data sets, where the labels indicate the relevance of documents to queries. Often the number of labels needed is too large to be created by the best annotators, and so less accurate labels (e.g. from crowdsourcing) must be used. This introduces errors in the labels, and thus errors in standard precision metrics (such as P@k and DCG); the lower the quality of the judge, the more errorful the labels, consequently the more inaccurate the metric. We introduce equations and algorithms that can adjust the metrics to the values they would have had if there were no annotation errors.

This is especially important when two search engines are compared by comparing their metrics. We give examples where one engine appeared to be statistically significantly better than the other, but the effect disappeared after the metrics were corrected for annotation error. In other words the evidence supporting a statistical difference was illusory, and caused by a failure to account for annotation error.

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