Arrival and Departure Dynamics in Social Networks

WSDM-2013
Arrival and Departure Dynamics in Social Networks
Shaomei Wu, Atish Das Sarma, Alex Fabrikant, Silvio Lattanzi, Andrew Tomkins
Abstract

In this paper, we consider the natural arrival and departure of users in a social network, and ask whether the dynamics of arrival, which have been studied in some depth, also explain the dynamics of departure, which are not as well studied.

Through study of the DBLP co-authorship network and a large online social network, we show that the dynamics of departure behave differently from the dynamics of formation.

In particular, the probability of departure of a user with few friends may be understood most accurately as a function of the raw number of friends who are active. For users with more friends, however, the probability of departure is best predicted by the overall fraction of the user's neighborhood that is active, independent of size.

We then study global properties of the sub-graphs induced by active and inactive users, and show that active users tend to belong to a core that is densifying and is significantly denser than the inactive users. Further, the inactive set of users exhibit a higher density and lower conductance than the degree distribution alone can explain. These two aspects suggest that nodes at the fringe are more likely to depart and subsequent departure are correlated among neighboring nodes in tightly-knit communities.

Another publication from the same category: Machine Learning and Data Science

Washinton DC, 27-30 Oct. 2014

Astro: A Predictive Model for Anomaly Detection and Feedback-based Scheduling on Hadoop

Chaitali Gupta, Mayank Bansal, Tzu-Cheng Chuang, Ranjan Sinha, Sami Ben-romdhane

The sheer growth in data volume and Hadoop cluster size make it a significant challenge to diagnose and locate problems in a production-level cluster environment efficiently and within a short period of time. Often times, the distributed monitoring systems are not capable of detecting a problem well in advance when a large-scale Hadoop cluster starts to deteriorate i n performance or becomes unavailable. Thus, inc o m i n g workloads, scheduled between the time when cluster starts to deteriorate and the time when the problem is identified, suffer from longer execution times. As a result, both reliability and throughput of the cluster reduce significantly. In this paper, we address this problem by proposing a system called Astro, which consists of a predictive model and an extension to the Hadoop scheduler. The predictive model in Astro takes into account a rich set of cluster behavioral information that are collected by monitoring processes and model them using machine learning algorithms to predict future behavior of the cluster. The Astro predictive model detects anomalies in the cluster and also identifies a ranked set of metrics that have contributed the most towards the problem. The Astro scheduler uses the prediction outcome and the list of metrics to decide whether it needs to move and reduce workloads from the problematic cluster nodes or to prevent additional workload allocations to them, in order to improve both throughput and reliability of the cluster. The results demonstrate that the Astro scheduler improves usage of cluster compute resources significantly by 64.23% compared to traditional Hadoop. Furthermore, the runtime of the benchmark application reduced by 26.68% during the time of anomaly, thus improving the cluster throughput.

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