Distributed Random Walks

Journal of the Association for Computing Machinery (JACM) – 2013
Distributed Random Walks
Atish Das Sarma, Danupon Nanongkai, Gopal Pandurangan, Prasad Tetali
Abstract

Performing random walks in networks is a fundamental primitive that has found applications in many areas of computer science, including distributed computing. In this article, we focus on the problem of sampling random walks efficiently in a distributed network and its applications. Given bandwidth constraints, the goal is to minimize the number of rounds required to obtain random walk samples. All previous algorithms that compute a random walk sample of length ℓ as a subroutine always do so naively, that is, in O(ℓ) rounds.

The main contribution of this article is a fast distributed algorithm for performing random walks. We present a sublinear time distributed algorithm for performing random walks whose time complexity is sublinear in the length of the walk. Our algorithm performs a random walk of length ℓ in Õ(√ℓD) rounds (Õ hides polylog n factors where n is the number of nodes in the network) with high probability on an undirected network, where D is the diameter of the network. For small diameter graphs, this is a significant improvement over the naive O(ℓ) bound.

Furthermore, our algorithm is optimal within a poly-logarithmic factor as there exists a matching lower bound [Nanongkai et al. 2011]. We further extend our algorithms to efficiently perform k independent random walks in Õ(√kℓD + k) rounds. We also show that our algorithm can be applied to speedup the more general Metropolis-Hastings sampling. Our random-walk algorithms can be used to speed up distributed algorithms in applications that use random walks as a subroutine. We present two main applications.

First, we give a fast distributed algorithm for computing a random spanning tree (RST) in an arbitrary (undirected unweighted) network which runs in Õ(√mD) rounds with high probability (m is the number of edges). Our second application is a fast decentralized algorithm for estimating mixing time and related parameters of the underlying network. Our algorithm is fully decentralized and can serve as a building block in the design of topologically-aware networks.

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Astro: A Predictive Model for Anomaly Detection and Feedback-based Scheduling on Hadoop

Chaitali Gupta, Mayank Bansal, Tzu-Cheng Chuang, Ranjan Sinha, Sami Ben-romdhane

The sheer growth in data volume and Hadoop cluster size make it a significant challenge to diagnose and locate problems in a production-level cluster environment efficiently and within a short period of time. Often times, the distributed monitoring systems are not capable of detecting a problem well in advance when a large-scale Hadoop cluster starts to deteriorate i n performance or becomes unavailable. Thus, inc o m i n g workloads, scheduled between the time when cluster starts to deteriorate and the time when the problem is identified, suffer from longer execution times. As a result, both reliability and throughput of the cluster reduce significantly. In this paper, we address this problem by proposing a system called Astro, which consists of a predictive model and an extension to the Hadoop scheduler. The predictive model in Astro takes into account a rich set of cluster behavioral information that are collected by monitoring processes and model them using machine learning algorithms to predict future behavior of the cluster. The Astro predictive model detects anomalies in the cluster and also identifies a ranked set of metrics that have contributed the most towards the problem. The Astro scheduler uses the prediction outcome and the list of metrics to decide whether it needs to move and reduce workloads from the problematic cluster nodes or to prevent additional workload allocations to them, in order to improve both throughput and reliability of the cluster. The results demonstrate that the Astro scheduler improves usage of cluster compute resources significantly by 64.23% compared to traditional Hadoop. Furthermore, the runtime of the benchmark application reduced by 26.68% during the time of anomaly, thus improving the cluster throughput.

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