Live Mobile Collaboration for Video Production

Design, Guidelines, and Requirements, Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 2012
Live Mobile Collaboration for Video Production
Marco deSa, David Shamma, Elizabeth Churchill
Abstract

Traditional cameras and video equipment are gradually losing the race with smart-phones and small mobile devices that allow video, photo and audio capturing on the go. Users are now quickly creating movies and taking photos whenever and wherever they go, particularly at concerts and events.

Still, in-situ media capturing with such devices poses constraints to any user, especially amateur ones. In this paper, we present the design and evaluation of a mobile video capture suite that allows for cooperative ad-hoc production. Our system relies on ad-hoc in-situ collaboration offering users the ability to switch between streams and cooperate with each other in order to capture better media with mobile devices.

Our main contribution arises from the description of our design process focusing on the prototyping approach and the qualitative analysis that followed. Furthermore, we contribute with lessons and design guidelines that emerged and apply to in-situ design of rich video collaborative experiences and with the elicitation of functional and usability requirements for collaborative video production using mobile devices.

Another publication from the same category: Machine Learning and Data Science

WWW '17 Perth Australia April 2017

Drawing Sound Conclusions from Noisy Judgments

David Goldberg, Andrew Trotman, Xiao Wang, Wei Min, Zongru Wan

The quality of a search engine is typically evaluated using hand-labeled data sets, where the labels indicate the relevance of documents to queries. Often the number of labels needed is too large to be created by the best annotators, and so less accurate labels (e.g. from crowdsourcing) must be used. This introduces errors in the labels, and thus errors in standard precision metrics (such as P@k and DCG); the lower the quality of the judge, the more errorful the labels, consequently the more inaccurate the metric. We introduce equations and algorithms that can adjust the metrics to the values they would have had if there were no annotation errors.

This is especially important when two search engines are compared by comparing their metrics. We give examples where one engine appeared to be statistically significantly better than the other, but the effect disappeared after the metrics were corrected for annotation error. In other words the evidence supporting a statistical difference was illusory, and caused by a failure to account for annotation error.

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