A new method for computing robustness margins for complex parametric uncertainties

Proceedings of CONTROL 1997
A new method for computing robustness margins for complex parametric uncertainties
Haniph Latchman, Nalin Pithwa, Kuo Yen, Robinson Piramuthu
eBay Authors
Abstract

Another publication from the same author:

WACV, March, 2016

Fashion Apparel Detection: The Role of Deep Convolutional Neural Network and Pose-dependent Priors

Kota Hara, Vignesh Jagadeesh, Robinson Piramuthu

In this work, we propose and address a new computer vision task, which we call fashion item detection, where the aim is to detect various fashion items a person in the image is wearing or carrying. The types of fashion items we consider in this work include hat, glasses, bag, pants, shoes and so on.

The detection of fashion items can be an important first step of various e-commerce applications for fashion industry. Our method is based on state-of-the-art object detection method which combines object proposal methods with a Deep Convolutional Neural Network.

Since the locations of fashion items are in strong correlation with the locations of body joints positions, we incorporate contextual information from body poses in order to improve the detection performance. Through the experiments, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

Another publication from the same category: Machine Learning and Data Science

WWW '17 Perth Australia April 2017

Drawing Sound Conclusions from Noisy Judgments

David Goldberg, Andrew Trotman, Xiao Wang, Wei Min, Zongru Wan

The quality of a search engine is typically evaluated using hand-labeled data sets, where the labels indicate the relevance of documents to queries. Often the number of labels needed is too large to be created by the best annotators, and so less accurate labels (e.g. from crowdsourcing) must be used. This introduces errors in the labels, and thus errors in standard precision metrics (such as P@k and DCG); the lower the quality of the judge, the more errorful the labels, consequently the more inaccurate the metric. We introduce equations and algorithms that can adjust the metrics to the values they would have had if there were no annotation errors.

This is especially important when two search engines are compared by comparing their metrics. We give examples where one engine appeared to be statistically significantly better than the other, but the effect disappeared after the metrics were corrected for annotation error. In other words the evidence supporting a statistical difference was illusory, and caused by a failure to account for annotation error.

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