Probabilistic Combination of Classifier and Cluster Ensembles for Non-transductive Learning

SIAM 2013
Probabilistic Combination of Classifier and Cluster Ensembles for Non-transductive Learning
Ayan Acharya, Eduardo R.Hruschka, Joydeep Ghosh, Badrul Sarwar, Jean-David Ruvini
Abstract

Unsupervised models can provide supplementary soft constraints to help classify new target data under the assumption that similar objects in the target set are more likely to share the same class label. Such models can also help detect possible dierences between training and target distributions,

which is useful in applications where concept drift may take place. This paper describes a Bayesian frame work that takes as input class labels from existing classefiers (designed based on labeled data from the source domain),

as well as cluster labels from a cluster ensemble operating solely on the target data to be classified and yields a con-ensus labeling of the target data. This framework is particularly useful when the statistics of the target data drift or change from those of the training data.

We also show that the proposed framework is privacy-aware and allows performing distributed learning when data/models have sharing restrictions. Experiments show that our framework can yield superior results to those provided by applying classifier ensembles only.

Another publication from the same category: Machine Learning and Data Science

WWW '17 Perth Australia April 2017

Drawing Sound Conclusions from Noisy Judgments

David Goldberg, Andrew Trotman, Xiao Wang, Wei Min, Zongru Wan

The quality of a search engine is typically evaluated using hand-labeled data sets, where the labels indicate the relevance of documents to queries. Often the number of labels needed is too large to be created by the best annotators, and so less accurate labels (e.g. from crowdsourcing) must be used. This introduces errors in the labels, and thus errors in standard precision metrics (such as P@k and DCG); the lower the quality of the judge, the more errorful the labels, consequently the more inaccurate the metric. We introduce equations and algorithms that can adjust the metrics to the values they would have had if there were no annotation errors.

This is especially important when two search engines are compared by comparing their metrics. We give examples where one engine appeared to be statistically significantly better than the other, but the effect disappeared after the metrics were corrected for annotation error. In other words the evidence supporting a statistical difference was illusory, and caused by a failure to account for annotation error.

Keywords