Structuring E-Commerce Inventory

Proceedings of the 50th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics, pages 805–814, Jeju, Republic of Korea, 8-14 July 2012. c 2012 Association for Computational Linguistics
Structuring E-Commerce Inventory
eBay Authors
Abstract

Large e-commerce enterprises feature millions of items entered daily by a large variety of sellers. While some sellers provide rich, structured descriptions of their items, a vast majority of them provide unstructured natural language descriptions. In the paper we present a 2 steps method for structuring items into descriptive properties. The first step consists in unsupervised property discovery and extraction. The second step involves supervised property synonym discovery using a maximum entropy based clustering algorithm. We evaluate our method on a year worth of ecommerce
data and show that it achieves excellent precision with good recall.

Another publication from the same author:

Proceedings of NAACL-HLT 2015, pages 160–167, Denver, Colorado, May 31 – June 5, 2015. c 2015 Association for Computational Linguistics

Distributed Word Representations Improve NER for e-Commerce

This paper presents a case study of using distributed word representations, word2vec in particular, for improving performance of Named Entity Recognition for the e-Commerce domain. We also demonstrate that distributed word representations trained on a smaller amount of in-domain data are more effective than word vectors trained on very large amount of out-of-domain data, and that their combination gives the best results.

Keywords

Another publication from the same category: Machine Learning and Data Science

WWW '17 Perth Australia April 2017

Drawing Sound Conclusions from Noisy Judgments

David Goldberg, Andrew Trotman, Xiao Wang, Wei Min, Zongru Wan

The quality of a search engine is typically evaluated using hand-labeled data sets, where the labels indicate the relevance of documents to queries. Often the number of labels needed is too large to be created by the best annotators, and so less accurate labels (e.g. from crowdsourcing) must be used. This introduces errors in the labels, and thus errors in standard precision metrics (such as P@k and DCG); the lower the quality of the judge, the more errorful the labels, consequently the more inaccurate the metric. We introduce equations and algorithms that can adjust the metrics to the values they would have had if there were no annotation errors.

This is especially important when two search engines are compared by comparing their metrics. We give examples where one engine appeared to be statistically significantly better than the other, but the effect disappeared after the metrics were corrected for annotation error. In other words the evidence supporting a statistical difference was illusory, and caused by a failure to account for annotation error.

Keywords