Your two weeks of fame and your grandmother’s

WWW 2012
Your two weeks of fame and your grandmother’s
James Cook, Atish Das Sarma, Alex Fabrikant, Andrew Tomkins
Abstract

Did celebrity last longer in 1929, 1992 or 2009? We investigate the phenomenon of fame by mining a collection of news articles that spans the twentieth century, and also perform a side study on a collection of blog posts from the last 10 years.

By analyzing mentions of personal names, we measure each person's time in the spotlight, and watch the distribution change from a century ago to a year ago. We expected to find a trend of decreasing durations of fame as news cycles accelerated and attention spans became shorter.

Instead, we find a remarkable consistency through most of the period we study. Through a century of rapid technological and societal change, through the appearance of Twitter, communication satellites and the Internet, we do not observe a significant change in typical duration of celebrity.

We also study the most famous of the famous, and find different results depending on our method for measuring duration of fame. With a method that may be thought of as measuring a spike of attention around a single narrow news story, we see the same result as before:

stories last as long now as they did in 1930. A second method, which may be thought of as measuring the duration of public interest in a person, indicates that famous people's presence in the news is becoming longer rather than shorter, an effect most likely driven by the wider distribution and higher volume of media in modern times.

Similar studies have been done with much shorter timescales specifically in the context of information spreading on Twitter and similar social networking site. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first massive scale study of this nature that spans over a century of archived data, thereby allowing us to track changes across decades.

Another publication from the same category: Machine Learning and Data Science

Washinton DC, 27-30 Oct. 2014

Astro: A Predictive Model for Anomaly Detection and Feedback-based Scheduling on Hadoop

Chaitali Gupta, Mayank Bansal, Tzu-Cheng Chuang, Ranjan Sinha, Sami Ben-romdhane

The sheer growth in data volume and Hadoop cluster size make it a significant challenge to diagnose and locate problems in a production-level cluster environment efficiently and within a short period of time. Often times, the distributed monitoring systems are not capable of detecting a problem well in advance when a large-scale Hadoop cluster starts to deteriorate i n performance or becomes unavailable. Thus, inc o m i n g workloads, scheduled between the time when cluster starts to deteriorate and the time when the problem is identified, suffer from longer execution times. As a result, both reliability and throughput of the cluster reduce significantly. In this paper, we address this problem by proposing a system called Astro, which consists of a predictive model and an extension to the Hadoop scheduler. The predictive model in Astro takes into account a rich set of cluster behavioral information that are collected by monitoring processes and model them using machine learning algorithms to predict future behavior of the cluster. The Astro predictive model detects anomalies in the cluster and also identifies a ranked set of metrics that have contributed the most towards the problem. The Astro scheduler uses the prediction outcome and the list of metrics to decide whether it needs to move and reduce workloads from the problematic cluster nodes or to prevent additional workload allocations to them, in order to improve both throughput and reliability of the cluster. The results demonstrate that the Astro scheduler improves usage of cluster compute resources significantly by 64.23% compared to traditional Hadoop. Furthermore, the runtime of the benchmark application reduced by 26.68% during the time of anomaly, thus improving the cluster throughput.

Keywords